Bad Financials or Pretextual Reasoning: Is the Closure of Unionizing Stores Illegal Union-Busting?

*Erin Turvey I. INTRODUCTION In 2021, American approval of labor unions reached the highest point since 1965.[1] During the first half of fiscal year (FY) 2022, union representation petitions[2] filed with the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) increased by 57%.[3] Moreover, unions won more NLRB representation elections in the first half of FY 2022 thanContinue reading “Bad Financials or Pretextual Reasoning: Is the Closure of Unionizing Stores Illegal Union-Busting?”

Cannabis in the Workplace: A Hazy Line Between Legalization and Discrimination

*Kenneth Wyatt II I. INTRODUCTION On May 26, 2022, Assembly Bill (AB) No. 2188 (Bill), passed the California State Assembly.[1] If signed into law, the Bill would take effect January 1, 2024.[2] As currently drafted, the Bill would amend California’s Fair Employment and Housing Act (FEHA),[3] which prohibits various forms of employment discrimination and empowersContinue reading “Cannabis in the Workplace: A Hazy Line Between Legalization and Discrimination”

Panel Discussion: “Innocence Isn’t Enough” The Intentionally High Bar to Exoneration

Join our panelists, Michele Nethercott, Erica J. Suter, and George Seward, in discussing challenges to successful claims of actual innocence, October 27th at 6:00pm in the Moot Courtroom. Click on the title for more details and for registration links.

Sackett v. EPA: The Supreme Court Sets Sail on the “Waters of the United States”

*Devyn King I. INTRODUCTION In April 2007, Michael and Chantal Sackett (the Sacketts) acquired building permits to begin constructing a family home on their lot near Priest Lake, Idaho.[1] The lot has no surface connection to any body of water and is separated from the nearest body of water by a county road.[2] However, it doesContinue reading “Sackett v. EPA: The Supreme Court Sets Sail on the “Waters of the United States””

You (Might) Have the Right to Remain Silent: Supreme Court Set to Decide Whether Public Accommodation Law Can Compel Speech

*Nicholas Balzano I. INTRODUCTION The Supreme Court’s 2021-2022 term was filled with widespread media coverage, particularly concerning the Court’s decisions in Dobbs v. Jackson and NYSRPA v. Bruen.[1] While the 2021-2022 term has ended, another case with the potential to create a new precedent undoing years of previous precedent looms on the horizon.[2] In 303Continue reading “You (Might) Have the Right to Remain Silent: Supreme Court Set to Decide Whether Public Accommodation Law Can Compel Speech”