#youvebeenserved: Court Holds Twitter as an Acceptable Method of Service of Process

#youvebeenserved: Court Holds Twitter as an Acceptable Method of Service of Process Julie Giardina* On September 30, 2016, U.S. Magistrate Judge Laurel Beeler granted a motion to serve process by alternative means, holding that the plaintiff could use Twitter to serve process on the defendant.  St. Francis Assisi v. Kuwait Fin. House, No. 3:16-CV-3240-LB, 2016Continue reading “#youvebeenserved: Court Holds Twitter as an Acceptable Method of Service of Process”

Wheels for My Wheels: Chicago Disability Groups Raise the Bar for Ridesharing Companies

 Wheels for My Wheels: Chicago Disability Groups Raise the Bar for Ridesharing Companies Kelly Goebel* In October, an Illinois disability group—Access Living of Metropolitan Chicago—and three disabled individuals affiliated with the group filed a lawsuit against Uber Technologies, Inc. in federal court.  Timothy Mclaughlin, Chicago Disability Group Sues Uber over Wheelchair Access, Reuters (Oct. 14, 2016,Continue reading “Wheels for My Wheels: Chicago Disability Groups Raise the Bar for Ridesharing Companies”

Bias and Secrecy in the Jury Room

Bias and Secrecy in the Jury Room Jillian Smith* The demand for secrecy in jury deliberations has been held as a standard of the utmost importance for centuries: Early notions that the jury should deliberate in secret were linked to the conception of the jury as an enigmatic, divinely inspired body. . . . [A]nyContinue reading “Bias and Secrecy in the Jury Room”

Same Crime, but Not the Same Time

Same Crime, but Not the Same Time                                                        Nicole Smith* The last couple of years have provided many clear examples that racism is still very prominent in the UnitedContinue reading “Same Crime, but Not the Same Time”

“Actually, Eye Didn’t See a Thing!”: How Jury Instructions in New Jersey May Affect the Jury’s Ability to Effectively Weigh Eyewitness Identification

“Actually, Eye Didn’t See a Thing!”: How Jury Instructions in New Jersey May Affect the Jury’s Ability to Effectively Weigh Eyewitness Identification Beatrice Campbell* One of the most essential pieces in identifying whether a crime has taken place is if someone witnessed that crime take place. It has long been held that eyewitness identification isContinue reading ““Actually, Eye Didn’t See a Thing!”: How Jury Instructions in New Jersey May Affect the Jury’s Ability to Effectively Weigh Eyewitness Identification”