The Fifth Amendment: You Have the Right to Remain Silent, but Should You?

*Hannah Krehely I. Introduction In August 2022, former President Donald Trump took full advantage of his Fifth Amendment right to remain silent in a deposition with the New York State Attorney General.[1] The deposition was part of a civil investigation into whether Trump and the Trump Organization fraudulently misrepresented the value of its properties toContinue reading “The Fifth Amendment: You Have the Right to Remain Silent, but Should You?”

You (Might) Have the Right to Remain Silent: Supreme Court Set to Decide Whether Public Accommodation Law Can Compel Speech

*Nicholas Balzano I. INTRODUCTION The Supreme Court’s 2021-2022 term was filled with widespread media coverage, particularly concerning the Court’s decisions in Dobbs v. Jackson and NYSRPA v. Bruen.[1] While the 2021-2022 term has ended, another case with the potential to create a new precedent undoing years of previous precedent looms on the horizon.[2] In 303Continue reading “You (Might) Have the Right to Remain Silent: Supreme Court Set to Decide Whether Public Accommodation Law Can Compel Speech”

Elephant in the Mirror: One Elephant’s Legal Journey to Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Happiness

*Torra Hausmann I. From Animal Welfare to Animal Rights For more than two decades, the Nonhuman Rights Project (NhRP), a Florida-based animal rights group, has advocated for judicial recognition of legal personhood for nonhuman animals.[1] Although animal law traditionally focused on animal welfare and protection, NhRP has pushed animal law to expand and include aContinue reading “Elephant in the Mirror: One Elephant’s Legal Journey to Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Happiness”

Is “Objective Reasonableness” Really Objective? Examining the Shortcomings of Police Use of Force Evaluations

*Celia Feldman Recent instances of police violence against black Americans have revived the debate about when police may use force.[1]  Despite the ongoing nature of police brutality, courts have continuously deferred to officers’ judgment in evaluating whether or not the force used was “excessive.”[2]  Courts continue to evaluate excessive force claims based on the standardContinue reading “Is “Objective Reasonableness” Really Objective? Examining the Shortcomings of Police Use of Force Evaluations”

Facial Recognition Technology: First and Fourth Amendment Implications

Facial Recognition Technology: First and Fourth Amendment Implications Ashley Triplett* On October 18, 2016, the Georgetown Law Center on Privacy & Technology released a report regarding the use of facial recognition technology in law enforcement agencies throughout the country.  Clare Garvie et al., The Perpetual Line-Up: Unregulated Police Face Recognition in America 1 (2016), https://www.perpetuallineup.org/sites/default/files/2016-12/The%20Perpetual%20Line-Up%20-%20Center%20on%20Privacy%20and%20Technology%20at%20Georgetown%20Law%20-%20121616.pdf.Continue reading “Facial Recognition Technology: First and Fourth Amendment Implications”