Elephant in the Mirror: One Elephant’s Legal Journey to Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Happiness

*Torra Hausmann I. From Animal Welfare to Animal Rights For more than two decades, the Nonhuman Rights Project (NhRP), a Florida-based animal rights group, has advocated for judicial recognition of legal personhood for nonhuman animals.[1] Although animal law traditionally focused on animal welfare and protection, NhRP has pushed animal law to expand and include aContinue reading “Elephant in the Mirror: One Elephant’s Legal Journey to Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Happiness”

Is “Objective Reasonableness” Really Objective? Examining the Shortcomings of Police Use of Force Evaluations

*Celia Feldman Recent instances of police violence against black Americans have revived the debate about when police may use force.[1]  Despite the ongoing nature of police brutality, courts have continuously deferred to officers’ judgment in evaluating whether or not the force used was “excessive.”[2]  Courts continue to evaluate excessive force claims based on the standardContinue reading “Is “Objective Reasonableness” Really Objective? Examining the Shortcomings of Police Use of Force Evaluations”

Facial Recognition Technology: First and Fourth Amendment Implications

Facial Recognition Technology: First and Fourth Amendment Implications Ashley Triplett* On October 18, 2016, the Georgetown Law Center on Privacy & Technology released a report regarding the use of facial recognition technology in law enforcement agencies throughout the country.  Clare Garvie et al., The Perpetual Line-Up: Unregulated Police Face Recognition in America 1 (2016), https://www.perpetuallineup.org/sites/default/files/2016-12/The%20Perpetual%20Line-Up%20-%20Center%20on%20Privacy%20and%20Technology%20at%20Georgetown%20Law%20-%20121616.pdf.Continue reading “Facial Recognition Technology: First and Fourth Amendment Implications”

Taxing & the Internet: Is It Time to “Reevaluate” National Bellas Hess, Inc. v. Department of Revenue of Illinois?

Taxing & the Internet: Is It Time to “Reevaluate” National Bellas Hess, Inc. v. Department of Revenue of Illinois? Gregory Waterworth* Marylanders pay taxes on purchases from Amazon.com, but do not pay taxes when shopping at Overstock.com. This arbitrary phenomenon stems from one source, National Bellas Hess, Inc. v. Department of Revenue of Illinois.  386Continue reading “Taxing & the Internet: Is It Time to “Reevaluate” National Bellas Hess, Inc. v. Department of Revenue of Illinois?”

The Constitutionality of Local and State Cash Bail Systems

The Constitutionality of Local and State Cash Bail Systems Marleigh Davis* Lately there has been a push encouraging states to move away from fixed cash bail systems and the practice of jailing those who cannot pay.  Pete Williams, Justice Department Says Poor Can’t Be Held when They Can’t Afford Bail, NBC News (Aug.19, 2016, 5:10Continue reading “The Constitutionality of Local and State Cash Bail Systems”