6,000 Federal Prisoners Released, But Where Did They Go?

6,000 Federal Prisoners Released, But Where Did They Go? Lelia Parker* The United States’ prisoner population is 20% of the world’s prison population, making the United States the “world’s largest jailer”—but this is nothing to boast about.  The Prison Crisis, ACLU, https://www.aclu.org/prison-crisis (last visited Feb. 21, 2016).  The War on Drugs, the longest war inContinue reading “6,000 Federal Prisoners Released, But Where Did They Go?”

But First, Let Me Take a Selfie…

But First, Let Me Take a Selfie: Milwaukee Attorney Snaps Selfie with Client After Jury Verdict Comes Back Not Guilty, Raising Concerns about Professionalism within this Generation and Whether the Government Can Regulate When One Can Take a Selfie Shannon Clancy* On September 18, 2015, Brandon Burnside, a Milwaukee citizen convicted of first-degree intentional homicide,Continue reading “But First, Let Me Take a Selfie…”

The U.S. Court of Appeals Upholds Minimum Wage and Overtime Protections for Home Care Workers

The U.S. Court of Appeals Upholds Minimum Wage and Overtime Protections for Home Care Workers Aiste Palskyte* On August 21, 2015, in Home Care Ass’n of America v. Weil, 799 F.3d 1084 (D.C. Cir. 2015), the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit upheld the Department of Labor (DOL) rule extending theContinue reading “The U.S. Court of Appeals Upholds Minimum Wage and Overtime Protections for Home Care Workers”

Understanding and Solving the Puerto Rican Municipal Bond Crisis

Where Less Light is Shed Than a Piece of Coal on a Moonless Night: Understanding and Solving the Puerto Rican Municipal Bond Crisis Stanley Carignan* Introduction In the final week of June 2015, the financial world’s attention focused on whether Greece would default on its loan to the International Monetary Fund (IMF). Anna Yukhananov, TheContinue reading “Understanding and Solving the Puerto Rican Municipal Bond Crisis”

Rethinking Solitary Confinement in American Prisons

Behind Bars: Rethinking Solitary Confinement in American Prisons Emily Steiner* Solitary confinement is a widely used and highly controversial practice in American prisons that has been the go-to method for handling discipline and security since the mid-1980s. Inmates held in solitary confinement spend approximately twenty-three hours a day in tiny, windowless cells, receiving their foodContinue reading “Rethinking Solitary Confinement in American Prisons”